Friday, December 31, 2010

torah bright snowboarder australian players pictures

Torah Jane Bright or known as Torah Bright (born December 27, 1986, Cooma, Australia) is an Australian snowboarder. She turned pro at age 14 and finished fifth in snowboarding at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino, Italy. She trains in Salt Lake City, Utah. She won gold in the 2010 Winter Olympics.Born to parents Peter and Marion Bright, Bright is the second youngest of five siblings. She grew up in Cooma, New South Wales at the base of the Snowy Mountains, and initially started out as a downhill ski racer. Older brother Ben picked up snowboarding and passed it on to Torah; as she has said, “I’ve never looked back.”

Bright uses a goofy stance and is coached by brother Ben. Older sister Rowena competed in the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics. Bright enjoys basketball and rollerblading.[citation needed]

Bright is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly known as Mormons). “For me it’s just a way of life – I don’t drink, smoke, drink tea or coffee, or have sex before marriage. I’ve never drunk or smoked but I’ll go out to dance and stay up late and then drive home at the end of the night.”

Bright finished 30th overall at the 2005 World Championships in Whistler, Canada and was runner up for the World Cup title during the 2003–04 season.

Bright entered only two World Cup events during the 2004–05 season, both in February at the 2006 Winter Olympic venue of Bardonecchia. She placed third in both events, qualifying for the Australian Olympic team.

In 2006, Bright earned a silver medal at the Winter X Games in Aspen, Colorado. She returned the following year, winning the gold medal in the women’s superpipe event. She is the first Australian snowboarder to ever win gold at the Winter X Games (11), beating Winter Olympic medalists Gretchen Bleiler and Hannah Teter.

In 2007, Bright took first at the Nissan X-Trail Nippon Open in the women’s halfpipe, giving her back-to-back wins in two consecutive competitions. At the 2007 World Super Pipe Championships in Park City, Utah, Bright won first place, beating 2002 Olympic gold medalist Kelly Clark. In late 2007, she made the podium for both events in the Roxy Chicken Jam, the final event in the TTR (Ticket to Ride) Snowboard Tour, where she became the 2007 TTR world champion.
torah bright
torah bright
In 2007, Bright took first at the Nissan X-Trail Nippon Open in the women’s halfpipe, giving her back-to-back wins in two consecutive competitions. At the 2007 World Super Pipe Championships in Park City, Utah, Bright won first place, beating 2002 Olympic gold medalist Kelly Clark. In late 2007, she made the podium for both events in the Roxy Chicken Jam, the final event in the TTR (Ticket to Ride) Snowboard Tour, where she became the 2007 TTR world champion.

In 2010, Bright suffered two concussions while in training for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. She carried the flag for Australia at the opening ceremonies. Qualifying in the number one spot for the final, she crashed out in her first run down and as a result had to run first in the second run. She posted a score of 45.0 which remained the high score through the second run and became the fourth Australian to win a Winter Olympics Gold medal.

torah bright snowboarder australian
torah bright snowboarder australian

Sunday, December 26, 2010

caroline wozniacki tennis players

Caroline Wozniacki (born 11 July 1990) is a Danish tennis player. As of 11 October 2010 (2010 -10-11)[update], she is ranked World No. 1 on the WTA Tour and will finish 2010 as World No. 1. She has won twelve WTA singles titles and was the runner-up at the 2009 US Open and the 2010 WTA Tour Championships
Career
[edit] 2005
Wozniacki won several junior tournaments in 2005, including the Orange Bowl tennis championship.[1] She made her debut on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour at Cincinnati's Western & Southern Financial Group Women's Open on 19 July 2005, losing to the top-seeded and later champion Patty Schnyder in the first round. In the Nordea Nordic Light Open, her other WTA tournament of the year, she lost to Martina Suchá in the first round.

[edit] 2006
In 2006, she was the first seed at the Australian Open (junior girls' singles), but lost the final to eighth-seeded Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia. She was seeded second with Anna Tatishvili in the doubles tournament, but the pair was knocked out in the semifinals by the French-Italian pair of Alizé Cornet and Corinna Dentoni, who were seeded eighth.

In February in Memphis, she reached her first WTA Tour quarterfinal, beating Kristina Brandi and Ashley Harkleroad in the first two rounds before losing to third-seeded Sofia Arvidsson of Sweden.
Before Wimbledon, Wozniacki won the exhibition tournament Liverpool International Tennis Tournament beating Ashley Harkleroad in the finals.[2]

Later that year, she was given a wildcard to the Wimbledon senior qualifying tournament, where she was beaten in the first qualifying round by Miho Saeki. However, Wozniacki went on to win the girls' singles tournament, beating Slovak Magdaléna Rybáriková in the finals.

In August, she reached another WTA Tour quarter-final, this time at the Nordea Nordic Light Open in Stockholm. She defeated top 100 players Iveta Benešová and Eleni Daniilidou before falling to eventual champion and third-seeded Jie Zheng.
Wozniacki was seeded second in Girls' Singles in the year's last major tournament, the US Open. In the first round on 3 September she won the first set against Russian Alexandra Panova, but was disqualified in the second set for verbally abusing an umpire. Wozniacki was said to have used an expletive in referring to a linesman who made a disputed call;[3] however, on her blog, she claimed to say "take your sunglasses of [sic]" and to be mistaken for talking to the linesman when she was criticizing herself after the next point.[4]

In her last junior tournament, the Osaka Mayor's Cup, she won the girls' singles and doubles.[5]

Her first senior title came shortly after on 29 October, when she won the $25,000 ITF-tournament in Istanbul by beating Tatjana Malek in the final.

Wozniacki was set to face Venus Williams on 27 November in an exhibition match in Copenhagen,[6] but five days before the event, Williams canceled because of an injury.[7] The two did, however, face each other in the Memphis WTA Tier III event on 20 February. Williams beat Wozniacki, ending the nine-match winning streak Wozniacki had at the time.

On 30 November, Wozniacki was named ambassador for Danish Junior Tennis by the Culture Minister of Denmark at the time, Brian Mikkelsen.
caroline wozniacki tennis players
caroline wozniacki tennis players
caroline wozniacki tennis players2007
In early January she played the Hong Kong exhibition tournament Watsons Water Champions Challenge.

On 4 February, she won the singles title in Ortisei, Italy, at an ITF $75,000 tournament, beating the Italian player Alberta Brianti 4–6, 7–5, 6–3. On 4 March, she won the $75,000 ITF tournament in Las Vegas, beating top-seed Akiko Morigami in the final 6–3, 6–2.

She obtained a wild card for the Pacific Life Open main draw and made her Tier I-debut there. She was knocked out in the second round by Martina Hingis 6–1, 6–3. The two faced each other again on 27 April in Copenhagen for an exhibition match, where Wozniacki again lost 7–6(7), 3–6, 6–2.

She then made the semifinals of the AIG Open in Tokyo in October, her first career WTA semifinal and also the first Danish woman to reach a WTA semifinal since Tine Scheuer-Larsen in 1986 at Bregenz. Wozniacki lost to Venus Williams 6–3, 7–5.

[edit] 2008
At the Australian Open, she defeated Gisela Dulko, 21st seed Alyona Bondarenko on her way to the Round of 16 where she lost to the eventual finalist and fourth-seeded Ana Ivanović.

At the French Open, she was seeded thirtieth, making this the first Grand Slam tournament in which Wozniacki was seeded. She lost in the third round to the eventual champion and World No. 2 Ana Ivanović.

At Wimbledon, she reached the third round but lost to second-seeded Jelena Janković.[8]

Wozniacki won her first ever WTA Tour title at the Nordic Light Open in Stockholm without losing a single set, defeating Vera Dushevina 6–0, 6–2 in the final. She had previously beaten the no. 5 seed Anabel Medina Garrigues in the quarterfinals and the top seed and World No. 10, Agnieszka Radwańska in the semifinals.

At the Summer Olympics in Beijing, she beat World No. 12 Daniela Hantuchová in the second round before falling to the eventual gold-medalist Elena Dementieva. Wozniacki then won her second WTA Tour title at the Pilot Pen Tennis in New Haven, defeating four seeded players in Dominika Cibulková, Marion Bartoli and Alizé Cornet en route to the final, where she defeated World No. 11 Anna Chakvetadze.

She was 21st seed at the US Open, and defeated World No. 14 Victoria Azarenka in the third round. In the fourth round, she lost to second-seeded and eventual runner-up Jelena Janković.

At the China Open, she lost her opening match to Anabel Medina Garrigues. However, she teamed up with Medina Garrigues to clinch the doubles title, defeating the Chinese duo of Han Xinyun and Xu Yi-Fan. It was Wozniacki's first WTA doubles title. At the Tier III AIG Japan Open Tennis Championships, she was the top seed for the first time on the WTA Tour, and won her third career title, defeating Kaia Kanepi of Estonia in the final.
caroline wozniacki tennis players
caroline wozniacki tennis players
caroline wozniacki tennis players
caroline wozniacki tennis players
caroline wozniacki tennis players
caroline wozniacki tennis players
caroline wozniacki tennis players

HONG KONG - fay, star ferry pier / declan, times square / zach & ronnie, kapok, 12/21-22/10






Photos of my Singapore & Kuala Lumpur trips on my visual diary.

Friday, December 24, 2010

world hottest women

While there used to be a social stigma attached to geekdom, nowadays it’s become fashionable to label oneself a nerd. While there are surely a cavalcade of factors behind this change, the rise of the internet has clearly played a substantial role in the nerd’s ascent.
The proliferation of scientifically minded women has proved instrumental in this shift, as the majority of contemporary tech pundits seem to belong to the fairer sex. Stranger still, many of these women possess the kind of looks one normally associates with supermodels and A-list actresses -- which, admittedly, is a great way to capture the interest and attention of a garden-variety nerd. While there are certainly a number of drop-dead gorgeous ladies within the world of tech media to choose from, we’ve narrowed the list down to 10.
Let the debate over the hottest women in tech begin…
Since starting her blog back in 2003, Wendy Cheng has slowly but surely established herself as one of the most original and opinionated voices within the increasingly crowded blogosphere. Although being one of the hottest women in tech has helped her success, Wendy’s ability to put her own off-kilter spin on the most mundane topics has won her a veritable legion of loyal followers, yet there’s little doubt that she has also managed to accumulate almost as many detractors. And Wendy’s brutal honesty on estrogen-centric topics, such as sex, dating and fashion, has made her an icon with the fairer sex. Wendy’s burgeoning fame has certainly provided her with a number of high-profile outlets from which to spout her opinions -- including Maxim, where she sometimes appears as a columnist -- and she also delivers regular vidcasts on clicknetwork.tv
world hottest women
world hottest women
world hottest women
world hottest women
world hottest women
world hottest women
world hottest women
world hottest women
world hottest women

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

rafael nadal roger federer

rafael nadal roger federer
rafael nadal roger federer
rafael nadal roger federer
rafael nadal roger federer
rafael nadal roger federer
rafael nadal roger federer
rafael nadal roger federer
rafael nadal roger federer